All posts filed under: Style

Clothes with Baraka

Here at The Modest Life we are passionate about supporting local businesses, women-run businesses, ethical-minded businesses… basically businesses that kick butt ūüôā Baraka Women is one such business. Designed by Eisha Saleh, an all round incredible lady, the clothes are made with the modest dresser in mind, with the most beautiful fabrics, made right here in Australia. With the release of her new “Pollyanna vintage” collection,¬†my sister and I jumped at the chance to play dress ups over a little catch up at my place… This print is so pretty and the fabric is luxuriously soft. Also, given that it is a wrap dress, it makes feeding baby easy. So basically it ticks all the boxes for me. Stylish, pretty and comfortable… We love the details on these pants, made from a vintage fabric. I’m wearing the Afternoon Wrap Dress. My sister is wearing: Outfit 1: The Emerald Day top with The Cornflower Pant in cream Outfit 2: The Envy Layered skirt. Photography: Z by Zahrah. Advertisements

A hijab by any other name is…fashion.

The hijab has been getting a lot of attention lately. Women who wear the hijab (Islamic head covering) are becoming more vocal, asserting their existence in a world that has attempted to define¬†them. Women who wear the hijab are speaking, shouting, writing, running, jumping, strutting, fencing, dancing and singing their way to recognition, in an attempt to redefine themselves on their own terms, to show the world that hey, we wear the hijab and we can do anything. Anything and everything. NOTHING holds me back.¬† I am a proud, hijab-wearing, independent, Muslim WOMAN who can make her own choices and do whatever she wants.¬† And the world is seemingly responding. People seem to be accepting the fact that (believe it or not!) Muslim women who wear the hijab are. Just. Human. Female. Girls. ETC. who happen to cover their heads and most of their bodies. Which is of course a good thing. Right? The “modest fashion” market is recognised as a booming niche that big corporations need to tap into. From Nike, to MNG, corporations …

Best on the Net

It’s been a big week in the world, with much to ponder on. Here are a few inspiring, positive and thought-provoking links to make this week that much better… A beautiful new children’s book compiles tales from Syrian refugees. Carla Zampatti designed a uniform for Westpac and included a style for hijabis. Check out this Kickstarter for a company designing activewear for women who wear hijab.¬† Finland is taking their awesome schools further by abandoning subjects for ‘events’ and ‘phenomena’ in an interdisciplinary format. Speaking of teaching, here’s a video that explores how there is no scientific proof that homework improves performance in elementary school. BAN HOMEWORK I say! The biggest supermoon is set to hit our world tonight, but it’s cloudy and raining here in Sydney ūüė¶ Did you read about the new screen time recommendations by doctors? About time they got onto this. Suzanne Barakat is an incredible ambassador for her religion, and this latest talk she delivered at TED is at once utterly heart-breaking but also motivating. She asks, what resources do …

‘Modest Fashion’ is an oxymoron…

‘Modest Fashion’ has become a catch phrase that is used to refer to a broad spectrum of clothing, generally in the milieu that is considered to be ‘covered up’. It may or may not include a head covering. In the past five years, with social media platforms accelerating as popular bases for self-promotion, ‘modest fashion’ has experienced¬†a huge (and this is an understatement) growth. With the aid of ‘modest fashion bloggers’ and ‘modest fashion businesses’ that have cropped up, the industry is now worth over $300 billion dollars, and is set to grow. Mainstream fashion houses such as Mango, DKNY and even Dolce & Gabbana have tapped into the niche by producing collections specifically for the modest market. Modest fashion bloggers have been a huge part of this growth in the industry. They have amassed (altogether) millions of followers across their social media, from Instagram, to Facebook to Youtube. More specifically, ‘hijab bloggers’ are increasingly sponsored by and affiliated with mainstream fashion houses, such as Ascia Farraj’s collaborations with Net-a-Porter and Dior, to name just …

Best on the Net

I hope you all had a lovely weekend and are ready for the new week! Here are some lovely, positive and uplifting stories to make the start of the week that much easier… 30 Captivating Historical photographs that need to be seen. What a teen girl’s magazine cover looks like when a graphic designer gets her hands on it. And here is one girl’s magazine that is trying to do it differently. A loving father photographs his autistic son’s unique habits. An enchantingly-rare all white reindeer is spotted on the side on the road in Sweden. One school is replacing detention with meditation and it is brilliant. Rahaf Khatib on the cover of “Women’s Running” magazine is how getting featured in mainstream media should be done. The essentials of Maternity Wear, and a few more of my favourite maternity wear/post-maternity wear-able brands here,¬†here, and here. Like, I really want this blush shirt dress that looks perfect for pregnancy and breastfeeding. Oh and if you’re in Sydney, the “Raising Positive Children” workshop run by the Al-Ghazzali …

Ethically made Earrings

Written by Subhi Bora.¬† When in Dubai, I wanted to buy gifts for people as well as something blingy for myself as a souvenir. I wanted something meaningful, beautiful, preferably made in the UAE, and with good ethical standards. This seemed near impossible amongst the endless imported designer stores and H&M-like options. BUT THEN I found the Gallery One¬†store in Dubai Mall and bought beautiful pieces of art, made in the UAE! And I came across this beautiful brand of jewellery Vanina World,¬†whose pieces are ethically made and use recycled materials. These particular earrings were made in collaboration with 2 NGOs based in Lebanon. I am super happy I found what I was looking for, all by chance. We CAN do better with our purchasing power, so let’s do it. *Photos by Saltanat Bora (editor). Please don’t use without permission of The Modest Life.

Maternity Wear Essentials

Finding comfortable yet stylish clothing whilst pregnant can be difficult, and inevitably, regardless of what you wear, you are bound to look like you swallowed a large watermelon by the time you get to the end of your pregnancy. Nonetheless, it is definitely a lot easier to find stylish and comfortable maternity wear what with the explosion in maternity brands lately, and also some non-maternity label clothing that can be adapted. This being my third pregnancy, a lesson that I have learnt is to ensure that whatever I buy for my changing body will also last me beyond pregnancy. I remember after I had my first daughter and I started to leave my house that I realised that I didn’t have any breastfeeding friendly clothing. It seemed like such a frustrating thing to think about- and out went the maxi dresses. Try lifting that up and shoving a baby under to breastfeed. Not. Happening. The following outfit options are actually clothes that I have worn many times throughout this pregnancy and most can be worn …

In the studio with… Eisha Saleh

I’m excited to bring you this “In the Studio with…” series as we sit down with, converse with and go behind-the-scenes of some of our favourite creatives who inspire us here at The Modest Life. For our first post in this series, our Editor Saltanat sat down with Eisha Saleh, creator and head designer at Baraka Women¬†where, over a beautiful light lunch prepared by Eisha herself, they¬†chatted about everything in this world but the following ten questions… Tell us a bit about yourself… My name is Eisha Saleh, I’m the designer-director at Baraka Women. I am Lebanese-Australian and have been in business since 2008. How did you begin Baraka Women? It all started when I first started to wear the hijab was transitioning from my non-hijab wardrobe to a new hijab-friendly wardrobe. As someone who was always interested in fashion, I was excited to build something new, but beautiful and modest clothing was just not available. The extent of hijab clothing in Australia were all imported from the Middle East and consisted of traditional Abayas. …

I REALLY like ZARA’s new “Green” collection but…

Let’s admit it. We have all been caught up in the hype of ZARA, and H&M. Personally, H&M never appealed to me. Their clothing always looked cheap and poor quality. But ZARA? Yeh, sure. I’ve been totally duped by them several times. Although I have to say that for a while, I’ve also been dissatisfied with their quality and pricing. Not to mention that their clothing sizes seem to be shrinking. I pick up a size ’14’ and it DOES NOT LOOK LIKE A SIZE 14. Don’t even get me started on the kid’s clothing. Girl’s dresses that are supposedly in the 12-18month size range, fit my daughter when she was 6 MONTHS OLD. Not only are they generally small everywhere (like the arms and shoulders), but they are¬†so short that I can’t decide if it is a dress or a top. Like, WHY? Putting aside these issues though, the latest bandwagon¬†that these fashion giants are jumping onto is the “eco-friendly”, “sustainable” and “ethical” clothing “trend”. ZARA just released their ‘Join Life’ (how sad is …

Girl’s Spring dresses

When it comes to children’s clothing I have a strong belief that they should be dressed age-appropriate. I don’t like the current trend of kid’s clothing that simply mimics adult’s clothing. Don’t get me wrong, I love a trench coat on a kid as much as the next person, but body-con mini-dresses with cut outs for a 5 year old? Hell no. But dresses in muted pastel tones with beautiful embroidery, in a baby-doll style, with a longer skirt made especially for twirling and in pretty floral prints? Yes, please. Below are my favourite dresses for little girls, dresses to walk barefoot in emerald grass, to pick¬†flowers in, to twirl around the house, to play with dolls whilst singing to themselves,¬†to read books, and climb trees, to care for their younger siblings in, to live¬†the wonderment of that dewy, magical and much too short phase that is childhood.   Featured image via Printebebe.